Angora Goats

Angora goats evolved on the Plains of Turkey near the city we now know as Ankara and from which the name “Angora” derives. Angora goats were highly regarded and jealously protected from exportation until the sixteenth century when the Angora goat was introduced into Spain and France.

The fleece taken from an Angora goat is called mohairToday there are over 200 000 pure bred goats in Australia. With the Australian Angora Goat developed as a result of successful interbreeding between the original Australian Angora and animals imported from South Africa and Texas.

Angora goats are found throughout Australia with the majority of stud animals being found in rural Victoria and New South Wales. The animals are raised in a similar manner to sheep, in paddocks of grass and hills. Angora goats enjoy eating a wide range of pasture and woody weeds. A rainfall of between 250mm and 600mm will suit Angoras.

The fleece taken from an Angora goat is called mohair. Mohair is similar to wool in chemical composition, but differs from wool in that it has a much smoother surface. It is a strong fibre that is elastic, has considerable lustre, and takes dye very well.

Wilton Park Angoras
Wilton Park Angoras

Mohair

Fabric made of mohair was known in England as early as the 8th century. In about 1820, raw mohair was first exported from Turkey to England, which then became the leading manufacturer of mohair products. The Yorkshire mills spun yarn that was exported around the world. Today, South Africa is the largest mohair producer in the world, with the majority of South African mohair being produced in the Eastern Cape.

Mohair is an all-season fashion fiber, in wonderfully warm knits and wovens for cold weather, and in airy, lightweight structures that breathe with the body for warm days. Used alone or in blends, mohair imparts its unique signature to an infinite variety of fabric textures, from lofty fleeces, rich tweeds and frothy knits, to crisp men’s suiting fabrics. As a fake fur fabric, mohair creates an environmentally friendly alternative to real fur. Mohair is a naturally soft fiber which is enhanced by current expertise and modern processing techniques.

Mohair can be used in many items; accessories of hats, scarves, lounging boots and slippers; throws and blankets; carpeting and rugs; wigs; paint rollers and ink transfer pads; and children’s toys. Through the ages the appeal of mohair has continued, adapting to the times with new and exciting fabric and style interpretations.

Mohair